November 7th, 2010

humster

stammtisch)

Salut mon tres cher ami)
Dis moi s`il tu plait, Stammtisch - qu`est-ce que c`est?
Quant a moi, je n`aime pas des films francais...
Pourquoi? Je ne sais pas)))

A bientot, Lelemiko)
humster

kaku

Michio Kaku: I say looking at the next 100 years that there are two trends in the world today. The first trend is toward what we call a type one civilization, a planetary civilization, a civilization that resembles something out of "Buck Rogers" or "Flash Gordon." A type two civilization is stellar. They consume so much energy they can play with stars. That is for example the Federation of Planets in "Star Trek." "Star Trek" would represent the typical type two civilization. Then we have type three, which is galactic like the Borg or "Independence Day" or the empire of "The Empire Strikes Back." That is a type three civilization, which is truly
galactic. Now by the time you reach type two, you are immortal. Nothing known to science can destroy a type two civilization. Comets, meteors, earthquakes, even a supernova a type two civilization would be able to survive even a supernova. Collapse ).
humster

future of newspaper

I work in an organization which has done away with the whole 'newspaper/magazine' culture altogether- we write on the web and we have our 'specialized' beats to cover. I think the competition would be in lateral expansion and not vertical. Superstructures will cease to exist. With increasing penetration of the Internet reporters will be able to sit in the farthest corners of the planet or in the comfort of their living rooms filing their stories. It is a cheaper option for newspaper or lets say media companies to hire remote resources and letting them work from home. That way even the remotest place/situation will get coverage- first hand coverage that too. Also reporters would be handling their own specialized verticals in a news organization. That way there will be lesser competition among employees and there'd be more to share- a peaceful atmosphere would prevail. The only drawback- monitoring across continents and timezones...